Flyhawk 1/700 HMS Lively 1941

HMS Lively was an L-class destroyer of the Royal Navy. She served during the Second World War, and was sunk in the Mediterranean in an air attack on 11 May 1942.

Commissioned in 1941, she was briefly active in home waters, sailing in the North Sea, but was soon reassigned to the Mediterranean, where she was active as part of the Mediterranean Fleet, and Force K, based at Malta. Lively took part in escorting several convoys to and from the island, as well as intercepting enemy supply convoys to North Africa. She took part in the First and Second Battles of Sirte, and was damaged on a number of occasions in air and surface attacks. She was eventually sunk off Tobruk in May 1942 while trying to intercept an enemy convoy. Despite a wartime career lasting less than a year since her commissioning, she won five battle honours: Atlantic 1941, Mediterranean 1941, Malta Convoys 1941-2, Libya 1942, and Sirte 1942.

More  information available about her here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Lively_(G40)

As far as I can tell no one has ever done a kit of HMS Lively before.

The kit comes with a top opening box and it is quite sturdy. The outside of the box has images of their planned HMS Agincourt and Scharnhorst kits. All the sprues are bagged and the larger items are in a bag of their own. The hull and deck parts are wrapped in foam and secured with elastic bands. The decal sheet is in a bag with the brass barrels. In the box we have:

  • 1 long, colour instruction sheet.
  • 8 Brass barrels
  • 1 small decal sheet
  • 206 approx plastic parts on 14 sprues
  • 6 separate larger parts

The level of detail in this kit is up to Flyhawk’s usual exceptional standards. The sprues with the finer parts have raised edges so the delicate parts are off the table when the sprue is laid down. Attachment points are small and ejector pin marks are out of the way. There is lots of fine detail on the parts The ship is built in 7 steps and the instructions are clear and colour coded where needed to aid in showing what goes where.

  1. Assembly of the hull with an option for waterline or full hull.
  2. Assemble the 4 main turrets and replace the plastic barrels with the brass ones. Add the forward main turret and some other small parts on the focsle.
  3. Assemble the bridge
  4. Add the bridge and main superstructure to the hull.
  5. Assemble the main mast.
  6. Assemble pom poms, ships boats and funnel and all them and some other parts amidships.
  7. Add the aft 2 turrets, torpedo tubes, depth charges and other small parts to the aft of the ship.

The colour scheme is shown in colour and the paints are called out by name and Mr. Hobby, Tamiya and WEM colour ranges. The views are clear and it will be easy to paint her from the information given. The small decal sheet has the ships pennant numbers, G40, G63, G87 and G74 and a couple of royal ensigns. (G63 is HMS Gurkha, G87 is HMS Lance and G74 is HMS Legion.)

The best price I can see for this kit is on HobbyEasy for $25.50. You can also buy the PE and a masking set.

Conclusion
This kit should do well for a couple of reasons. Firstly it’s an excellent kit in its own right with an impressive level of detail on the 200+ parts of the basic kit and even more detail when you use the PE parts available in the upgrade set. Secondly, it’s the first time anyone has done a plastic 1/700 HMS Lively, so that will make it very popular among builders of WW2 Royal Navy kits.

Many thanks to Flyhawk for sending along the kit for review.

Paul Tosney – Editor
ModelBuilder International
Scifiantasy
HobbyLink International
Hoblylink International Shop
eBay Store
Inextension


Paul Tosney

Paul has been with Model Builder International since almost the beginning. He started building models as a boy, and took a hiatus, but started building again a few years ago. He builds pretty much anything, but mostly WW2, with a smattering of modern and the occasional SciFi model.

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: